Beguiling bee-eaters

I used to think my favourite African bird was a fish eagle – their majestic stature, haunting cry that echoes across the water and their distinctive plumage. But recently I’ve had to make space for the smaller but perfectly beguiling bee eater. The pair of white fronted bee-eaters above were seen in the Lower Zambezi. I had to sit patiently for what felt hours but was probably more like 20 minutes, trying to catch a shot of the two together, in focus, properly composed. Many many misses later, my patience was rewarded…one had caught an insect, and perched right in front of my camera. It’s not a perfect shot by any means, but was by far the best of the day. So this pretty pair put them in top spot for the time being, not just for this experience but for their delicate colouring, elegant flight and Zorro-style masks. Who knows how long they’ll stay in number one position, I guess my next safari will be the judge of that!

Advertisements

I should have known better…

…than to go on safari with a shopping list. I’ve been on too many safaris to think that I could have a wishlist of animals to see and for that list to transpire into reality. I’d told clients countless times to just enjoy every second, the smells, sounds, observing the smaller creatures and not just focussing on the bigger ones. I knew better. But somehow, I’d ended up on safari, desperate to find a leopard. Sure, we’d seen wild dogs within the first hour of our safari – pretty incredible. But we wanted to see a leopard. It was the South Luangwa, in Zambia, renowned for being one of the best places to see leopard in Africa – so everyone I knew kept telling me before I left the UK. And somehow I listened, and it transformed what was one of the best safaris of my life, into a slightly crazed, desperate search for that elusive spotty cat.

We had five days on safari in the Luangwa, staying in two superb bushcamps in the very heart of the park. The guides were top notch, it was the end of the dry season which meant conditions for game viewing were superb. As the dry season wears on, the grass is grazed and trampled down and the water sources dry up, meaning grazers are commonly found around waterholes or the rivers, and predators are never far away. Each morning we set out before the heat of the day on a walking safari, which the South Luangwa is famed for. Great for taking in the smaller details of the bush, learning about the flora, how plants adapt themselves against invasion from insects and grazing animals, watching warthogs and their baby wartlets scurry away, and creeping up close to the spectacular clouds of carmine bee-eaters nesting in the banks of the river. Elephants are prolific in the park, too, and rarely a walk went by where we didn’t have a heart-racing encounter with a herd or handful of ele’s – trust me, you will never appreciate how large, powerful and intimidating an elephant can be until you meet one on foot, rather than from the comfort of a 4×4.

The afternoons were hot and spent zooming around on game drives, to see what we could see, stopping at sunset each day to soak our feet in the cool river and enjoy a cool gin and tonic, contemplating the last rays of sunshine. Then the game drive turned into a night drive, and this was prime leopard time – even the guides said so. We searched in the fading light, and then following the spotlight, listening for alarm calls from monkeys or birds which might point us towards our leopard. We searched and searched, secretly praying for a spotty cat.

In the end, we found one, but not the kind of spotty cat I was after! Instead of a leopard, we found a serval cat, skipping across the branches of a tree. Five days went by in this way, and we left the South Luangwa without a leopard in sight. I wasn’t as disappointed as you’d think. It served me right for going on safari with a shopping list – and I knew it. Plus it gives me an excellent reason to go back one day…